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Angola’s government is running short of money just as the issue of who might succeed President José Eduardo dos Santos again comes under discussion. The president raised eyebrows in early July when he said he intended to see out his term of office, and there has been increased repression of government opponents. At the same time, a leaked memo from Sonangol chairman Francisco de Lemos José Maria has sharply criticised the legacy of his predecessor Manuel Vicente, now Angolan vice-president, and spelled out the problems facing the company.

Angola
Subscriber

Eskom chief executive Phakamani Hadebe has resigned due to ill health, the struggling utility announced on 24 May. “It is no secret that this role comes with unimaginable demands which have unfortunately had a negative impact on my health. In the best interests of Eskom and my family, I have therefore decided to step down,” an Eskom statement quoted Hadebe as saying.Hadebe, who will step down at the end of July, was the eighth chief executive since 2010, if those filling the role in an acting capacity are included.

South Africa
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US developer Symbion Power has sharply criticised Tanzania Electricity Supply Company (Tanesco) for what it says is its continued failure to pay for power supplied by the Ubungo plant. Despite losing a separate arbitration case brought by Standard Chartered Bank, the utility remains intransigent in its dealings with Symbion. But Ubungo has been shut down for several months and another big arbitration case could be on the cards, with all the accompanying bad press for President John Magufuli’s clean-up campaign.

Tanzania
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Algeria can be a difficult jurisdiction, but Sonatrach’s termination of the Isarène E&P contract may not just be driven by aggressive resource nationalism, writes John Hamilton.

Algeria
Issue 342 - 16 March 2017

EITI outlines project reporting

Subscriber

The board of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) has set out how members should report payments at project level in its 51 implementing countries, a month after President Donald Trump cancelled a US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rule requiring US companies to detail their payments.

Issue 340 - 16 February 2017

Morocco: Nakkouch leaves Nareva

Free

Ahmed Nakkouch, founding head of Morocco’s biggest private developer and a former head of state utility Office National de l’Electricité, is retiring from Nareva. He will be replaced by 46-year-old Aymane Taud, a director of Nareva’s parent company Société Nationale d’Investissement (SNI) since November 2006. Taud was appointed head of SNI’s fisheries companies Marona and Arpem in mid-2015. He came to SNI after heading BMCE Capital Conseil.

Morocco
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In the third year of his presidency, Félix Tshisekedi has outflanked Joseph Kabila to the extent that the former president is now lying low at his ranch near Lubumbashi amid fears his senator-for-life status may be insufficient to give immunity from eventual prosecution. The resignation on 29 January of prime minister Sylvestre Ilunga Ilunkamba was another victory over key Kabila allies in a war of attrition for control of Democratic Republic of Congo that has seen members of the ex-president’s Front Commun pour le Congo (FCC) flooding to join Tshisekedi’s Union Sacré́e pour la Nation (USN).

DR Congo
Issue 448 - 24 October 2021

Zesco’s debt balloons to $3.5bn

Free

State utility Zesco’s debts have reached $3.5bn – $1bn more than previously thought – due to a combination of rising liabilities to independent power producers (IPPs), long-running disputes with mining firms and the depreciation of the local currency, according to energy minister Peter Kapala.

Zambia
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The Zondo Commission has finally published the key volumes of part IV of the State Capture Commission Report, detailing the Gupta brothers’ takeover of South Africa’s energy sector. A range of people have been identified as potentially guilty of criminal offences, writes Dan Marks.

South Africa
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French investigators on 25 April charged industrialist Vincent Bolloré and two colleagues as part of an investigation into suspected bribery of foreign officials in Guinea and Togo. Prosecutors are investigating whether Bolloré’s Havas communications business helped African leaders win power in return for contracts for Bolloré Group to operate ports. Bolloré Group said in a statement that a subsidiary was under investigation “regarding the payment of provisions for communication services in Guinea and Togo that were provided in 2009 and 2010”.

Subscriber

President Abdelaziz Bouteflika may be gone, but demonstrators continue to call for radical change to a system dominated by ‘deep state’ players, including a genuine crackdown on corruption. Senior establishment figures are trying to persuade the popular ‘Hirak’ street protest movement that the system can reform itself, with assurances that recent scandals such as the Kamel El-Bouchi cocaine affair and older cases including the collapse of Khalifa Bank should be revisited.

Algeria
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Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) has agreed to pay out $84m to residents of the Bodo community for two of the Niger Delta’s largest oil spills, which took place in 2008 and 2009. Some $54m of the settlement will go to around 15,600 fisherman, while the remaining $30m will be left for the community. Outgoing SPDC managing director Mutiu Sunmonu said the company accepted responsibility for the spills, both of which SPDC admits were caused by operational failures of the pipelines.

Nigeria
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The sacking of petroleum, energy and renewable energy minister Thierry Tanoh, formally announced on 10 December, was not unexpected. Tanoh had been in conflict with powerful players, notably influential presidential adviser and former minister Adama Toungara, over a planned audit of the sector, further reforms and project developments. The former banker had also clashed with Prime Minister Amadou Gon Coulibaly, who was lobbying President Alassane Dramane Ouattara to sack the minister.

Côte d'Ivoire
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The South African government suffered a major setback in its efforts to procure nuclear power when the High Court in Cape Town ruled on 26 April that three intergovernmental agreements, two ministerial determinations and all subsequent procurement activity was unlawful and unconstitutional. The decision means that two ministerial determinations – announcements by the energy minister that a certain amount of capacity will be procured from a particular technology – from 2013 and 2016 underpinning the government’s ambitious, and controversial, efforts to procure 9,600MW of nuclear power have been set aside.

South Africa
Issue 253 - 03 May 2013

DR Congo: EITI suspension


Subscriber

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) temporarily suspended the Democratic Republic of Congo on 17 April, saying its reports were not up to standard in terms of full disclosure and the reliability of the figures. EITI national co-ordinator Mack Dumba Jeremy has said that tax authorities have failed to account for $88m in revenue from the mining sector.

DR Congo