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Despite governance shortfalls and a number of crises, President Filipe Nyusi’s government has reassured investors with its support for transformational LNG schemes, leading towards final investment decisions and financial close in the months to come. This is a major success for an African gas industry where smaller projects seem to be making more impact than the majority of big-ticket schemes. Mozambique’s progress reassured CbI Meetings’ 2-3 May Africa Investment Exchange: Gas event in London that the African industry can deliver world-scale projects.

Tanzania
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The controversial marketing company Congolaise de Trading was the product of what officials call “a past phase” in Congo-B politics. In 1998, soon after returning to power, President Denis Sassou Nguesso discovered that French oil company Elf (since merged into Total) was fraudulently representing its Congo-B production operations.

Congo Brazzaville
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Attacks by rebel forces in May have come closer to the oilfields in Upper Nile state than at any point in the 18-month conflict. On 16 May, rebel fighters captured the Upper Nile capital Malakal, and on 19 May they took Melut, 200km north of Malakal and just 40km from the main oil-producing hub of Paloich. The opposition claims to have besieged oilfields around Paloich and captured the town of Mangok, the gteway to the Adrar oilfield, one of the largest fields in the area.

South Sudan
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Emboldened by President Donald Trump’s election win, Republican lawmakers have started the process of dismantling the bipartisan Cardin-Lugar anti-corruption rule, which requires oil, gas and mining companies publicly listed in the US to publish their payments to governments in countries where they operate. The rule became law in 2010 as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, but its implementation was held up by legal challenges and it was released by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) only in June 2016 after Oxfam America sued to speed the process up.

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Has Field Marshal Khalifa Haftar overreached in his high-risk military advance on Tripoli? The dominant view is that he has erred politically by throwing everything into an all-or-nothing play for domination, and militarily by underestimating the difficulty of conquering the capital and the cohesiveness of local militias. The alternative view is that while military options remain open to him, there is no reason to compromise, especially with the militias who increasingly dominate and control the UN-backed Government of National Accord (GNA). He may still have some advantage to gain.

Libya
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The United States Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (Ofac) has lifted sanctions on National Oil Corporation (NOC)’s Benghazi-based subsidiary Arabian Gulf Oil Company (Agoco).

Libya
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Oil and gas minister Abdulrahman Ben Yezza has reassured striking workers at Sirte Oil Company (SOC)’s Brega complex that the government will do what it takes to bring the security situation there under control.

Libya
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While talking up its efforts to support the oil and gas industry through the current downturn with a two-year extension to all exploration contracts, the Ministry of Mines and Hydrocarbons has published a new ministerial order that limits to three years the period during which companies can employ expatriate workers. “The order follows years of successful capacity building and training within local companies and local labour in Equatorial Guinea, which has made available a well-trained pool of local talent,” a ministry statement said.

Equatorial Guinea
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As the new regime in Tripoli establishes its authority, Libya urgently needs to restart oil production.  A potentially divisive mix of old and new faces is emerging to take charge of the sector, writes John Hamilton

Libya
Issue 380 - 08 November 2018

Tanzania: Tender chaos

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Tanzania Electric Supply Company Ltd (Tanesco) has cancelled and then reissued three recently announced tenders for large-scale solar, wind and coal as Tanzania continues to bewilder investors. The tenders are part of government efforts to revive the power sector in time for elections in 2020 following a period of stagnation under the administration of President John Magufuli. Bids are now due by 7 December.Tanesco said the tenders had been cancelled due to “unavoidable circumstances”.

Tanzania
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The jihadist organisations that have prospered in the ruins of the Libyan state since the overthrow of the dictator Colonel Muammar Qadhafi have started to fight among themselves, adding another level of complexity to an already fragmented political scene. A related North Africa-wide effort to unite more established Al-Qaeda elements against the insurgent Islamic State (IS) is being led by the notorious one-eyed Sahelian terrorist, kidnapper and smuggler, Mokhtar Belmokhtar, who almost certainly escaped death despite being the target of a US Air Force raid on a farm outside Ajdabiya on 13 June.

Libya
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President Paul Biya has not survived in power for over 37 years by showing great sensitivity to local or international criticism, let alone by accommodating outright opposition. Like other leaders and sympathetic opinion-formers across Central Africa and beyond, he has rationalised authoritarian tendencies and crony relations by insisting on his regime’s essential role in ensuring stability. While governance shortfalls may define the daily lives of Cameroon’s multi-ethnic population, a nation created first by German colonisation and then by division between the British and French empires has traditionally avoided identity-based conflict.

Cameroon
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The Tanzanian government has unveiled a new gas policy focused on prioritising the domestic market rather than the large-scale exports favoured by IOCs, writes Hugh Boylan.

Tanzania
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The governments of Sudan and South Sudan have agreed to renegotiate the terms under which Juba exports its oil, according to officials from the two countries. Transit fees of almost $25/bbl, combined with the drop in the global oil price and the discount at which Dar Blend crude trades, meant that South Sudan faced selling its oil at a loss. Output dropped sharply, heralding a possible shutdown and requiring an urgent renegotiation of transit terms.

South Sudan
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With the threat of another pipeline shutdown averted, South Sudan’s oil production is expected to increase from about 180,000 b/d to 200,000 b/d in the coming weeks, and to at least 250,000 b/d by year-end, according to oil industry sources in Juba. During a one-day summit in Khartoum on 3 September with South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir, Sudanese leader Omar Hassan Al-Bashir agreed to reverse his decision, announced on 9 June, to stop receiving, processing and transporting crude from South Sudan within 60 days. Under pressure from oil companies and foreign governments, Bashir had already twice delayed the anticipated shutdown, originally scheduled for 7 August, to 22 August and then to 6 September.

South Sudan | Sudan