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Issue 206 - 02 April 2011

Clare Short named EITI chair

Subscriber

Former UK international development secretary Clare Short has replaced Peter Eigen as chair of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). An outspoken, sometimes controversial figure, notably over her opposition to UK

Free

Elections on 23 December are unlikely to deliver the change Democratic Republic of Congo so badly needs. The outlook is deteriorating as polling day approaches, following deaths at rallies in support of opposition candidate Martin Fayulu, and an apparently deliberate fire in Kinshasa that destroyed controversial voting machines. Fears have been expressed that the elections will be far from free and fair, potentially stoking further conflict as President Joseph Kabila Kabange – who has been in power since 2001 – seeks to hold on to state institutions via his hand-picked successor, Emmanuel Ramazani Shadary.

DR Congo
Subscriber

Diplomatic tension between Egypt and Ethiopia has risen in recent weeks as negotiations have stalled over the filling of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (Gerd) and the potential effect it will have on the reallocation of Nile River water rights. If the current rate of construction continues, the testing of power generation could begin next year, but technical studies on the best way to begin the water storage process have not yet been agreed.

Egypt | Ethiopia
Issue 243 - 15 November 2012

Nigerian power ministry reshuffle

Subscriber

President Goodluck Jonathan on 1 November announced a minor cabinet reshuffle, swapping minister of state for power Darius Dickson Ishaku with minister of state for Niger Delta affairs Hajiya Zainab Ibrahim Kuchi. The move comes only two months after the resignation of Professor Barth Nnaji as power minister, after which Ishaku stood in as the senior minister on an interim basis.

Nigeria
Subscriber

An agreement on maritime jurisdiction areas signed by the head of the Libyan Government of National Accord’s Presidency Council Fayez Al-Sarraj and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in late November has provoked furious responses from the governments of Egypt, Greece and Cyprus and has dragged Libya into the intractable geopolitical morass of the eastern Mediterranean.Important elements of the accord are not yet clear. For instance, it is not yet obvious whether it is a memorandum of understanding or an actual treaty.

Libya
Issue 239 - 21 September 2012

Draft European transparency rules approved

Subscriber

The European Parliament’s Legal Affairs Committee has voted in favour of a draft law that would require European resource companies to declare their payments to governments worldwide.

Subscriber

Mining gold from the hillsides in north-east Guinea poses huge challenges for investors and the community alike, underlining the need to tackle a range of sensitive issues and manage expectations in long ignored regions of highly under-developed economies, writes Thalia Griffiths, recently in Lero.

Guinea
Subscriber

Controversial former energy minister Chakib Khelil returned to Algeria on 17 March for the first time since his abrupt departure three years ago, pursued by allegations concerning his role in the Sonatrach corruption scandals (AE 317/17, 297/24). The path towards his rehabilitation was prepared by Front Nationale de Liberation leader Amar Saâdani, who is loyal to President Abdelaziz Bouteflika but not universally supported within his faction.

Algeria
Subscriber

There was dramatic confirmation that Nigeria’s power sector is bracing to undergo another period of political flux when, on 4 February, it was announced that respected regulator Ransome Owan and other officials had been held on corruption charges. The EFCC’s swoop came as new Power Minister Rilwan Babalola is seeking to stamp his mark on the troubled sector and add those missing gigawatts to the national grid as quickly as possible – even if it means challenging other key players, write Jon Marks and Leo Lawal.

Nigeria
Subscriber

The beheading of local guards and the kidnapping of foreigners at the Ghani field by units allegedly part of Islamic State (IS), and their destruction of facilities at this and other fields, has obliged National Oil Corporation (NOC) to shut down and abandon most of the south-west Sirte Basin. Local oil workers are now reluctant to work at locations in the desert unless more Petroleum Facilities Guards (PFGs) with better equipment are deployed. If the attacks continue, there are two main ways that the situation could deteriorate.

Libya
Issue 365 - 15 March 2018

Egypt: Mubadala buys into Zohr

Subscriber

A subsidiary of Abu Dhabi sovereign wealth fund Mubadala Investment Company has bought a 10% stake in the Shorouk concession from Eni for $934m, giving it part ownership of the super-giant Zohr field. Zohr started production in December 2017 and is now producing 400mcf/d. It is expected to reach 700mcf/d by May and to achieve its intended plateau of 2.7bcf/d by the end of 2019.Eni has farmed out two other stakes in the concession.

Egypt
Issue 383 - 20 December 2018

New protest shuts in Libyan oil field

Subscriber

On 17 December, National Oil Corporation (NOC) declared force majeure at the 315,000 b/d Sharara oil field, which is operated by the Akakus Oil Operations joint venture and co-owned by NOC, Spain’s Repsol, France’s Total, Austria’s OMV and Norway’s Equinor. It had declared force majeure on exports from the Zawiya terminal of crude oil produced at Sharara on 9 December, the day the field was taken over by a militia named the 30th Light Infantry Battalion alongside a new popular movement uniting various civil society groups calling itself Ghathab Fezzan (Wrath of Fezzan).

Libya
Free

There is speculation that Rachid Ghannouchi’s Islamist Ennahda (Renaissance) party will gain a big slice of the vote when Tunisia goes to the polls on 23 October to elect the constituent assembly that will draw up a new constitution, and that polling will be followed by significant changes in the interim government ahead of an elected administration emerging by H2 2012.

Tunisia
Subscriber

The announcement on 22 September of an inter-governmental agreement between South Africa and Russia on strategic partnership and co-operation in nuclear energy and industry has been greeted with bemusement by South Africans. The agreement was signed by South African energy minister Tina Joemat-Pettersson and the director-general of Russia’s state atomic energy corporation Rosatom, Sergey Kirienko, at the 58th general conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna.“The agreement lays the foundation for the large-scale nuclear power plant (NPP) procurement and development programme of South Africa based on the construction in RSA of new nuclear power plants with Russian VVER reactors with total installed capacity of up to 9.6GW (up to 8 NPP units),” said a joint statement published on the Department of Energy and Rosatom websites.

South Africa
Subscriber

There was an unexpected frisson around the packed conference hall in Hamburg when, on 4 May, following the usual bullish opening remarks by senior German officials promoting renewable energy options, Ghanaian power minister Kwabena Donkor proposed an alternative strategy to meet his country’s 12% annual electricity demand growth while driving industrial development. Under heavy pressure over catastrophic power cuts, the National Democratic Congress (NDC) government has decided to give priority to building coal-fired plants, to be supported by combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plants supplied by imported gas.

Ghana