0
 

Search results

Selected filters:

General

Type

Sector

Regions

Sort options

1,193 results found for your search

Issue 172 - 16 October 2009

IOCs await decisions in DRC

Subscriber

DRC’s untapped mining wealth is well known, its hydrocarbons potential less so. The government has drawn up a new hydrocarbons law, which is now going through the increasingly assertive and well-informed two-chamber parliament

DR Congo
Free

A suspension of supply by bulk distribution companies in protest over unpaid government debt caused severe fuel shortages in late June. The crisis took almost two weeks to resolve in the south, particularly in Accra, where shortages were described as the worst since 2006. Several local bodies have vehemently criticised what they see as another government failure to meet basic needs. The downstream regulator, the National Petroleum Authority (NPA), called for an end to government fuel subsidies, and Accra-based think-tanks also called for pump prices to rise.

Ghana
Subscriber

Libya’s National Oil Corporation (NOC) has come up with a bold plan to restore output to pre-revolution levels by the end of this year. If it succeeds, the corporation will have effectively established itself as the bedrock of a united Libya while staving off an otherwise inevitable economic collapse and worsening of the civil conflict. The plan requires NOC to take on greater executive authority while attracting a new wave of foreign investment, something that until recently was all but unthinkable.

Libya
Free

Viewed from Harare, it is business as usual on all fronts: European Union and US sanctions continue to inconvenience President Robert Mugabe and key members of his regime; swathes of the population (including the estimated 4m Zimbabweans living abroad) despair of genuine political change that can unlock the country’s huge potential. However, after a 16 March referendum approved a new constitution, elections will follow by 29 June at the latest. Off the record, leaders of coalition partner the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) say their horizons are limited to winning extra seats and obtaining more ministerial posts in the next government. This recognises the effective hold that Mugabe’s Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (Zanu PF), backed by a powerful securocrat elite, exerts over power.

Zimbabwe
Free

Continued fighting in Côte d’Ivoire’s main city underlines that, despite the dramatic capture of former president Laurent Gbagbo, the conflict is far from over. Some 16 years after he was excluded from the 1995 election, Alassane Ouattara finally gets to be president, but in the worst possible circumstances.

Côte d'Ivoire
Free

A wave of strikes, adding to the localised protests across the country over social and economic issues, says much about the current mood in a North African state that has so far resisted the galvanic change that marked the early months of the Arab Spring.

Algeria
Issue 296 - 12 March 2015

Libya: Tobruk eyes guns and oil

Subscriber

Islamic State (IS) attacks on oil sector targets make it ever more urgent that the conflict between the democratically elected House of Representatives (HoR) in Tobruk and the rival Tripoli-based General National Congress (GNC) is resolved. United Nations Support Mission in Libya leader Bernardino Leon is pushing hard at talks in Morocco for a unity government-based peace deal. But widespread suspicion that GNC-backed Fajr Libya forces may have colluded in the attacks will damage already low levels of trust. Many HoR supporters believe it is capable of achieving military dominance, and do not understand why it should give up its democratic authority.

Libya
Subscriber

Democratic Republic of Congo’s latest national conference has heard a call for a new push to settle the maritime border with Angola and enable the country to take a potential share of the region’s offshore oil. The ‘concertations nationales’ held from 7 September to 5 October in Kinshasa, gathered MPs, senators and civil society organisations to discuss the country’s political and economic future. Kinshasa University geologist Professor Ezequiel Kasongo Numbi Kashemukunda, a former MP of President Joseph Kabila’s Alliance de la Majorité Présidentielle and former diplomat, called on the government to stop wasting time and energy in trying to secure the recognition of its claims over the continental shelf beyond the 200-mile limit.

DR Congo | Angola
Issue 131 - 25 January 2008

Taipei dumped for Beijing

Free

Malawi has become the latest country to cut off diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favour of the People’s Republic of China

Malawi
Subscriber

Gabon has written to United Nations secretary-general Ban Ki-moon rejecting part of Angola’s December 2013 submission to the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS). The northern maritime limit separating Angola’s territorial waters to the north of Cabinda from Republic of Congo’s waters, instead of running straight from the coastline, turns off abruptly to the north and intersects first Congo’s continental shelf area, then Gabon’s.

Gabon
Subscriber

Eskom’s chief financial officer (CFO), Anoj Singh, is the latest senior official to be the subject of media allegations about his relationship with the Gupta family. The allegations, reported by The Times newspaper on 24 July, will surprise few in the industry. They came as another blow in a week in which Eskom reported a dramatic fall in after-tax profits to R888m ($6.77m), from R5bn in 2016, and denied media reports that it was facing a cash crisis that had left it with only enough funds for the next three months.

South Africa
Subscriber

Ethiopia’s 6,000MW Grand Renaissance dam on the Blue Nile River is the centrepiece of the country’s five-year Growth and Transformation Programme, which aims to turn the country into a middle-income nation by 2015, expanding its electricity coverage to 75% of the population and supplying the region with power. The dam’s commissioning was originally scheduled to begin during late 2013, but disputes over the potential impact on Ethiopia’s downstream neighbours, Sudan and Egypt, have hampered progress. In 2010, Ethiopia signed an agreement with several other countries in the region, except for Sudan and Egypt, asserting its right to build on the Blue Nile (AE 218/5).

Ethiopia
Free

Tunisia’s Jasmine revolution, which drove Zine El Abidine Ben Ali into exile in Saudi Arabia on 13 January, was the unexpected trigger that has made Arab populations wake up after decades of submission to personalised, autocratic regimes. But it is events in Egypt that will drive how the ‘Arab street’ and those who seek

Tunisia
Issue 364 - 01 March 2018

Veolia Gabon assets seized by state

Subscriber

Armed security forces seized control of Société d’Energie et d’Eau du Gabon (Seeg) on 16 February, putting an end to Veolia’s concession contract on the orders of the Water and Energy Ministry. French director-general Antoine Boo has been replaced by a Gabonese, Marcellin Massila Akendengue. Minister Patrick Eyogo Edzang said Gabon wanted to “take back its sovereignty” over the water and power sectors.

Gabon
Free

Sonatrach director-general Abdelmoumen Ould Kaddour regularly tours the hydrocarbons giant’s sprawling empire, rallying workers and telling journalists about Algeria’s return to producing oil and gas on a global scale, after years of corruption scandals and management inertia. On his 8 February visit to Hassi R’Mel, he announced that Sonatrach would invest $56bn in 2018-22. In an interview, he referred to discussions with Total on an unspecified $5bn project. After a long period of tensions with the French major, this is likely to be a major new petrochemicals project, giving further substance to claims Algeria is back as a force in the industry.

Algeria